GUEST COLUMN: “We Don’t Haze Pledges. We Forcefully Welcome Them.” — Bob Biggs, Phi Delta Theta Exec. VP, CEO

The recent death of a prospective member of a chapter of our fine organization is certainly a tragedy that never should have happened. Rest assured that the incident involving the deceased 18-year-old LSU freshman will be sufficiently investigated to give the appearance that we care.

To that end, the chapter in question has been suspended, and its charter has been removed.

As the executive vice president and CEO of Phi Delta Theta International Fraternity, I want to state unequivocally that we don’t haze pledges. We forcefully welcome them into their new fraternity.

Hazing is wrong and will not be tolerated. Emphatically ushering a new member into the fold, however, is an acceptable tradition that engenders a sense of belonging.

The sense of acceptance is often overwhelming, to the point they pass out. They’re simply incapacitated by the kinship offered by their elder brothers.

We certainly wouldn’t want any one of our pledges to have any doubts that he really was a full-fledged member of Phi Delta Theta. That’s why, when we accept them into our brotherhood, we do it vehemently and without compromise.

In fact, the welcoming we offer new members is so vigorous, the sense of acceptance is often overwhelming, to the point they pass out. They’re simply incapacitated by the kinship offered by their elder brothers.

If and when they come to, though, they know beyond a shadow of a doubt that something special happened that led to that blackout. They may not remember all the specifics, but the overall sense of belonging is unmistakable.

This is why, since 1848, over 250,000 men have chosen to be initiated into our society. If you’re interested in joining us, we promise not to haze you. We will, however, make you feel so welcome, it’ll make you sick with acceptance.

 

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