WAR FOR ST. GEORGE: Letters From the Field, Vol. XVI – “Massacre at Wilson Fields”

Samuel James Graves, St. George 3rd Infantry
5:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Dearest Eleanor,

Samual-James-GravesThe hopes of continuing this fight for our beloved land’s liberty are fading fast, my dear, with the news that our forces were summarily overpowered in what was admittedly a desperate engagement at Wilson Fields.

Our boys had nary a chance to fire a single shot before having their legs blown out from under them. Just as soon as it started, it was over, with our leaders miraculously managing to escape with their lives and a brutal lesson in the horrors of doing battle in the domain of Wilson Fields.

The territory of Wilson Fields is abounding with pitfalls and entanglements, a perilous place that should be avoided by all means necessary.

Col. Lionel Rainey and the rest of the St. George leadership learned, in a most merciless fashion, about the rules of engagement — or, more precisely, the lack thereof — when contending in the province of Wilson Fields. The territory of Wilson Fields is abounding with pitfalls and entanglements, a perilous place that should be avoided by all means necessary.

Sadly, our hand was forced. The survival of our future as a free and independent city demanded that we take on the enemy in that heinous locale. And now, my love, that future is in serious doubt following what was nothing short of a massacre.

As for what, if any, maneuver our leaders will devise next, I am nowhere near certain. However, I most certainly pray to God Almighty with every fiber of my being that I should live out the rest of my days without ever setting foot on the damnable, capriciously hazardous turf of Wilson Fields.

All My Love,
Sam

 

Robert Maxwell Parker, Baton Rouge 2nd Artillery
7:00 p.m. Monday, July 6, 2015

Dearest Angelina,

Robert-Maxwell-ParkerWe are still at “war” with the rebel forces of St. George, but only in the slightest sense of the word. As far as I’m concerned, calling it war is a great injustice to the term.

The word “war” connotes two opposing sides wrestling for control of territory. However, in our current situation, only our flailing enemy is feebly trying to wrest, while we are practically at rest.

My love, it seems dishonest to say we are engaged in a battle when one sees his bullheaded, all-but-defeated enemy almost instantaneously knocked down to his knees in the practically unnavigable terrain of Wilson Fields, particularly when you consider that I and the rest of the forces of Baton Rouge were essentially just spectators, sipping our coffee, viewing the proceedings.

It seems dishonest to say we are engaged in a battle when one sees his bullheaded, all-but-defeated enemy almost instantaneously knocked down to his knees.

Reasonable men would have long ago realized that continuing this fight is exceedingly foolhardy, but these are not reasonable men, the men who lead the forces of St. George. Reasonable men would have never sought to conduct such a seditious effort in the first place.

Nevertheless, I pray that this absolute debacle, thanks in large part to the treacherousness of Wilson Fields, will finally manage to deliver, through the impossibly thick skulls of St. George’s leaders, the message that they are in fact beaten. But until that message is ultimately received by their resistant brains, and the men and I finally can come home, please know that you are…

Always In My Heart,
Robert

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Editorial Staff
A random collection of overqualified, underachieving smartasses.

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WAR FOR ST. GEORGE: Letters From the Field, Vol. XVII – “The War Is Over. For Now.”

It would seem I and the rest of the men out here are coming home, but sadly, not for the reason we had so long and vehemently fought and prayed, my love.