Toddler Decries Diaper Industry’s “Unrealistic” Beauty Standards

A 3-year-old boy is upset with diaper companies for setting what he calls unreasonable and unhealthy expectations of his peers’ appearances.

Joey Dagostino claims highly idealized images of small children portrayed on diaper packages and advertisements are harmful, leading to kids entering their preschool years with body-image issues and doubts about their self-worth.

“Every kid you see on a pack of Pampers or Luvs is just so damn perfect, it’s freaky,” Dagostino explains. “Hell, even the babies on the generic diaper packs are unrealistically cuter than anything drawn by a Disney animator.”

Dagostino says he’s on a mission to call attention to “Big Diaper’s” use of extremely airbrushed depictions of children and the ramifications of creating such “unachievable” expectations.

“Even the babies on the generic diaper packs are unrealistically cuter than anything drawn by a Disney animator.”

“When’s the last time you saw a baby on a pack of Huggies with actual baby fat?” Dagostino asks. “No wonder some kids refuse to feed. They’re afraid of not meeting these impossible standards.”

Dagostino notes that children depicted in diaper marketing are conspicuously free from birthmarks, rashes, and other markings frequently found on average youngsters like him.

“Sure, Pampers hired Drew Brees and his huge birthmark to do a commercial for them, but he was a grown man who had already won a Super Bowl,” he explains. “There’s no way they would’ve put him and that thing on his face anywhere near a camera if he were my age.”

The aspiring activist adds, “It’s bad enough kids like me have issues with walking. We don’t need issues with self-image, too.”RedShtick-Top-ColumnStop

About Tony Swartz

Tony Swartz
Tony is proof that you can write Peabody-worthy news without ever darkening the halls of journalism school.

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