Ass and Ditties: Is There Really a Ren-ASS-ance in Pop Music Right Now?

Music Snob“When you shake your ass/They notice fast.” – George Michael, “Freedom ’90”

There’s little doubt that popular music has been about rebellious fanny shaking since Little Richard first wrote and released “Tutti Frutti” almost 60 years ago. That tune, now cataloged in no less than the U.S. Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry, originally included the racy lyrics: “Tutti Frutti, good booty/If it don’t fit, don’t force it/You can grease it, make it easy.” However, those verses later were changed to the better-known, but somewhat nonsensical, “Tutti Frutti/All rooty/Tutti Frutti/All rooty.”

As music has progressed and changed over time, ample buttocks have remained a staple subject for quite a few well-loved and best-selling artists.

It seems plain as the swish in Little Richard’s step that this song is really about tender, fleshy backsides and, furthermore, is possibly additionally about putting lubed-up fruits in one’s posterior. It’s no wonder, really, that the lyrics were altered, as songs about organic, edible dildos are still a very tough sell in today’s competitive music market.

As music has progressed and changed over time, ample buttocks have remained a staple subject for quite a few well-loved and best-selling artists. In the ’70s, most notably, there was Queen’s “Fat Bottomed Girls” and KC and the Sunshine Band’s “Shake, Shake, Shake (Shake Your Booty).”

In the ’80s, E.U. had a hit with the very catchy “Da Butt,” and Eddie Murphy, during his illustrious and blessedly brief singing career, had a hit with “Boogie in Your Butt.” With lyrics like “Say, put a tree in your butt/Put a, a bumblebee in your butt/Put a clock in your butt/Put a big rock in your butt,” “Boogie in Your Butt” was widely believed at the time to be inspired by Nelson Mandela’s inspiring fight against the injustice of apartheid in South Africa.

OMG Becky ...
OMG Becky …

However, it wasn’t until the year 1992 that the most widely known pop song about a sizable caboose, “Baby Got Back” by African-American aristocrat and rapper Sir Mix-A-Lot, topped the charts. A classic ode to both round and big patoots, especially those specifically from Oakland, CA, this lovely arrangement is known and loved by millions of white girls who get drunk and sing it at karaoke, usually in groups of three or more.

This delicate melody opened pop music’s lower colon, if you will, letting loose a raging flood of asstastic, humongous patootie anthems thereafter, including “Rump Shaker” by Wreckx-N-Effect, “Thong Song,” by Sisqo, “Shake Ya Ass,” by Mystikal, “Bootylicious” by Destiny’s Child, and, of course, the touching pop standard “Kobe, How My Ass Taste?” by Shaquille O’Neal.

Nicki Minaj appreciates one of the world's natural wonders in her "Anaconda" video.
Nicki Minaj appreciates one of the world’s natural wonders in her “Anaconda” video.

So here we are, in 2014, with musical artists still producing and consumers still buying music about large keisters. Rapper and prodigious tuckus owner Nicki Minaj recently released a music video and single called “Anaconda,” which prominently samples Sir Mix-A-Lot’s “Baby Got Back” and discusses the merits of her substantial bum at length. J. Lo and Iggy Azalea also have just released their collaboration,”Booty,” a rousing and danceable tune about their own thick and juicy derrieres.

Songs about gargantuan behinds have simply never gone out of style.

Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea teamed up from the waist down for "Booty."
Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea teamed up from the waist down for “Booty.”

With even Taylor Swift getting in the tushie game with “Shake It Off,” many have wondered if pop music is now experiencing a colossal pooter renaissance of sorts. I’d have to answer that question with a resounding and firm “Maybe.” The truth of the matter seems to be that songs about gargantuan behinds have simply never gone out of style.

Alas, it’s said that there’s nothing new under the sun, and frankly, that is the case with both popular music and ladies’ heinies. There’s not so much a renaissance of wazoo music as there is a fresh wave of it wafting, wafting to our ears much like aural flatulence. Because while there’s nothing new under the sun, there’s also nothing new where the sun don’t shine.

So … Would you like fries with that shake, shake, shake?RedShtick-Top-ColumnStop

About Stephanie Landry

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Stephanie Landry is a lover, not a fighter, with the exception of some inanimate objects. Sing out to her here, or stand at her window with your boombox blasting your mixtape. Either way.

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